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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal found in the catalog.

Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal

M. S. Bedinger

Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal

by M. S. Bedinger

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  • 34 Currently reading

Published by U.S. G.P.O., Free on application to the Books and Open-File Reports Section, U.S. Geological Survey in Washington, Denver, CO .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Low level radioactive waste disposal facilities -- Design and construction.,
  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground.,
  • Hydrology.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 32-35).

    Statementby M.S. Bedinger.
    SeriesU.S. Geological Survey circular ;, 1034
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTD898.155.D47 B43 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 36 p. :
    Number of Pages36
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2206667M
    LC Control Number89028810

    3 Radiological Characterization Context Interrelated issues of D&D projects: Regulatory deadlines, costs (maintenance, contractor, waste) Characterization: Radiation protection of workers, waste categorization and optimization, monitoring, clearance criteria Initial characterization: a key stage for D&D success “Segregation and characterization of contaminated materials. Unnumbered Report Yucca Mountain, a preliminary reference list of scientific articles () relating to the high-level radioactive waste repository, by C. D. Basso, 68 p. Unnumbered Report Executive Summary - the U. S. gold industry, , by J. L. Dobra and P. R. Thomas, 56 p.

    REVISION: 1 DATE.; Aug 1! INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LDE rryrm INSTRUMENT: ——————————————————————— MANUFACTURER. Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal. USGS Publications Warehouse. Bedinger, M.S. The objective for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste repository sites is to isolate the waste from the biosphere until the waste no longer poses an unacceptable hazard as a result of.

    Bedinger, Marion S., ed., et al. Safe Disposal of Radionuclides in Low Level Radioactive Waste Repository Sites: Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Workshop. USGS July , , Big Bear Lake, CA., Proceedings. FEBRUARY VOLUME XXII NUMBER 1.


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Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal by M. S. Bedinger Download PDF EPUB FB2

Geohydrologic Aspects for Siting and Design of Low-Level Radioactive-Waste Disposal Usgs Circular [Bedinger, M.S.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Geohydrologic Aspects for Siting and Design of Low-Level Radioactive-Waste Disposal Usgs Circular Author: M.S.

Bedinger. Get this from a library. Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal. [M S Bedinger; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal Book Bedinger, M.S.

The objective for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste repository sites is to isolate the waste from the biosphere until the waste no longer poses an unacceptable hazard.

Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal. Book Bedinger, M.S. The objective for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste repository sites is to isolate the waste from the biosphere until the waste no longer poses an unacceptable hazard.

Low-level radioactive waste commonly is isolated at. The objective for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste repository sites is to isolate the waste from the biosphere until the waste no longer poses an unacceptable hazard.

Full text of "Geological and hydrological factors for siting hazardous or low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities" See other formats. High-level radioactive waste management concerns how radioactive materials created during production of nuclear power and nuclear weapons are dealt with.

Radioactive waste contains a mixture of short-lived and long-lived nuclides, as well as non-radioactive nuclides. There was reported s tonnes of high-level nuclear waste stored in the USA in Fischer, J.M.,Sediment properties and water movement through shallow unsaturated alluvium at an arid site for disposal of low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada: U.S.

Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report48 p. Fischer, J.M.,Geohydrology of the near-surface unsaturated zone adjacent to the disposal site for low-level radioactive.

USGS Environmental Health Mission Area Bibliography, Mixed, Low-Level Radioactive and Other Wastes--Amargosa Desert Research Site, NevadaGeohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level J.J., Stonestrom, D.A., and Andraski, B.J.,Unsaturated zone CO 2, CH 4, and δ 13 C-CO 2 at an arid region low-level radioactive.

We use cookies to offer you a better experience, personalize content, tailor advertising, provide social media features, and better understand the use of our services. Geohydrologic Aspects for Siting and Design of Low-Level Radioactive-Waste Disposal: M.S.

Bedinger. USGS. Hydrology. The American West: The Pictorial Epic of a Continent: Beebe, Lucius, and Charles Clegg. Gem Guides Book Co. Prospecting.

Radioactive wastes are wastes that contain radioactive material. Radioactive wastes are usually by-products of nuclear power generation and other applications of nuclear fission or nuclear technology, such as research and ctive waste is hazardous to human health and the environment, and is regulated by government agencies in order to protect human health and the environment.

Geohydrologic aspects for siting and design of low-level radioactive-waste disposal [U.S. Geological Survey Circular ]. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S.

Geological Survey. Marshall, Alan () The Social and Ethical Aspects of Nuclear Waste, Electronic Green Jour. The siting of locally unwanted land uses: Towards a cooperative approach.

Author links open overlay panel Audrey M. Armour. Show moreCited by: low-level radioactive waste disposal at Weldon Springs, Missouri as well as geomechanical modeling for the Swedish-U.S. STRIPA project. With GeoTrans, he was the Principal Investigator for the technical support work for the Yakima Indians at BWIP.

David R. Buss, Ph.D. -Principal Hydrogeologist, GeoTrans, Inc. Exposure to high levels of radioactive waste may cause serious harm or ent of an adult animal with radiation or some other mutation-causing effect, such as a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, may cause cancer in the humans it has been calculated that a 5 sievert dose is usually fatal, and the lifetime risk of dying from radiation-induced cancer from a single dose of Committee reviewed the progress of the work sinceand concluded that ".

experience both in the field and in the laboratory on disposal of wastes in salt have been very produc tive, well conceived, and that plans for the future are very promising" (NAS-NRC Committee on Geologic Aspects of Radioactive Waste Disposal, ).Author: P.F.

Gnirk, W.C. McClain. their emissions and set up an environmental monitoring program to assure that the design criteria and license conditions have been met.

Radioactive Waste Disposal Licenses The authority for the NRC to regulate high-level waste disposal originates from Public Lawalso known as the "Nuclear Waste Policy Act of ". Modeling and Low-Level Waste Management: An Interagency Workshop December Denver. Colorado Compiled by Craig A.

Little Health and Safety Research Division and Leroy E. Stratton Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the INTERAGENCY LOW-LEVEL WASTE MODELING COMMITTEE: Robert S.

Lowrie (Chairman). Full text of "A Study of trench covers to minimize infiltration at waste disposal sites: task 1 report" See other formats. Radioactivity naturally decays over time, so radioactive waste has to be isolated and confined in appropriate disposal facilities for a sufficient period of time until it no longer poses a period of time waste must be stored depends on the type of waste and radioactive isotopes.

It can range from a few days for very short-lived isotopes to millions of years for spent nuclear fuel.Policy conflict has been the hallmark of the nuclear waste issue for the past 20 years, Congress has been forced to deal with the issue periodically, when the reluctance of legislators to address this intractable problem has been over­ come by fears that inaction will hurt political careers.

The year 1 was one watershed year for congressional action on high-level nuclear waste; 1 The extent of the changes depends on the design and siting of the intake and discharge and the nature of the body of water (Langford ).

Because many nuclear plants are located on large rivers, lakes, reservoirs or on the seacoast, such localized altered current patterns are minor.